Ed NoiseCat | Two Tigers Gallery
21813
single,single-portfolio_page,postid-21813,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,select-theme-ver-2.3,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.4.3,vc_responsive

Ed NoiseCat

Shapeshifter Brushed Aluminum

Shapeshifter Brushed Aluminum

In ENC
Shapeshifter Steel Sculpture

Shapeshifter Steel Sculpture

In ENC
White Raven

White Raven

In ENC
Wolves of the Sea

Wolves of the Sea

In ENC

Biography

Ed NoiseCat

 

Ed Archie NoiseCat – produces custom and limited edition Bronze Sculpture, Glass Sculpture, Carved Wood, and Jewelry.

Born in 1959 NoiseCat grew up in British Columbia’s remote, mountainous interior with his mother’s people, the Canim Lake Band of Shuswap Indians. He draws inspiration from his mother’s plateau culture, and from his father’s people, the Stlitlimx, closer to the coast.

NoiseCat graduated from the prestigious Emily Carr College of Art and Design, where he studied printmaking. In 1986, he headed to New York to work as a fine art lithographer at print shops, including world-renowned Tyler Graphics. In the decade that followed, he lived in Boston, Minneapolis, Miami and Oakland. Currently Ed resides in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Often referenced as the leading voice among the elite within the Contemporary Native Art idiom, Ed Archie NoiseCat’s multi-medium body of work in glass, bronze, metal, and wood has earned significant acclaim internationally. Commanding a broad knowledge of his peoples’ history, NoiseCat draws on the stories of his ancestors to create distinctive 3-dimensional images executed with unequaled craftsmanship.

NoiseCat loves to work on a grand scale. He took the top prize at Portland’s first annual Indian Art Northwest with a free standing, six-foot square carved cedar screen. He won a major Midwest public art commission with a four-foot high portrait mask honoring Little Crow, one of the region’s great chiefs. He also works on a smaller scale — carving masks, rattles, panels, puppets and more. Many pieces incorporate transformational elements. He recently introduced two new lines of work: sculptural jewelry in silver, gold and semi-precious stones; and art furniture that joins the structural forms of the Northwest longhouse with traditional Japanese woodworking techniques.